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11-year-old Uvalde survivor, victims’ parents plead with congressional spirits to do something about mass shootings

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What will it take for Republican lawmakers to implement meaningful gun safety reforms so America can stop setting records for mass shootings and burying elementary school students in tiny coffins? If the said Republicans really cared about innocent children—or the “sanctity of human life” in general—as much as they hysterically claim they do, gun laws would already have been passed, be it after Uvalde, after Buffalo, or after one of the the hundreds of mass shootings that have taken place this year alone. Unfortunately, conservatives don’t care about children or adults – at least not as much as they do about guns. That’s why a bill expected to pass in the House on Wednesday has virtually no chance of surviving in the Senate, and a bill being negotiated in the Senate won’t include measures like a ban on assault weapons, improved background checks. or restrictions on high-capacity ammunition magazines. It’s also why we’re somehow at a point where 11-year-old school shooting survivors love: Miah Cerrillo must testify before Congress in an effort to convince these lawmakers to stop allowing the killing of small children by sociopaths so that “law-abiding citizens” can cling to their guns.

On Wednesday, in a pre-recorded video, Cerrillo told Congress she saw her teacher at Robb Elementary School get shot in the head by the 18-year-old gunman, and after seeing a friend killed, she got “a little blood and… it all over me” hoping to convince the shooter that she was already dead.

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In the video, Cerrillo’s father asks her if she still feels safe at school and shakes her head no. “Why?” he asks. “I don’t want it to happen again,” she responds.

Witnesses on Wednesday were also Felix and Kimberly Rubio whose 10-year-old daughter, Lexi, was killed in the Uvalde shooting. Kimberly talked about the couple’s last moments with their daughter – they promised to have an ice cream after school to celebrate an award Lexi had won and then said goodbye to her, a decision Kimberly said “will haunt me for the rest of my life.”

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Lawmakers also heard from Uvalde pediatrician Dr. Ray Guerrero, who told them that at the local hospital he found two children, whose bodies had been so pulverized by the bullets fired at them, decapitated, whose flesh had been torn so much that the only clue to their identity was the blood-spattered cartoon clothes that still stick to it. Clinging to life and finding nothing.” He added: “I could only hope that these two bodies were a tragic exception to the list of survivors. But while I waited there with my fellow Uvalde doctors, nurses, first responders, and hospital staff for other victims we hoped to rescue, they never arrived. All that remained were the bodies of 17 more children and the two teachers who cared for them, who devoted their careers to nurturing and respecting the awe-inspiring potential of each of them. Just like we doctors do.”

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As Lexi’s mother told the elected officials, “Somewhere out there is a mother who listens to our testimony and thinks, ‘I can’t even imagine their pain,’ not knowing that one day our reality will be hers. Unless we act now.”

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