China calls Albanians ignorant, says chances of reset with Australia are diminishing

The alliance’s interest in challenges in the Indo-Pacific came against the background of the Russian invasion of Ukraine, which China has both supported and indirectly facilitated.

Asked about China’s response to the NATO summit and Beijing’s comments that he threatened to reset Australia-China relations, Mr Albanian said he was “strong supporter of the NATO communiqué”. He noted that the communiqué referred to China’s new relationship with Russia after the war in Ukraine.

“We need to reaffirm our democratic values ​​and that has happened at the NATO summit,” said Mr Albanese before leaving Madrid for Paris.

‘New Australian leader… misinformed’

Beijing has accused Mr Albanian of ignoring his stance on the war in Ukraine and his relationship with Taiwan.

“It’s hard to believe that the new Australian leader can be so misinformed that he doesn’t know China’s stance on the crisis in Ukraine, which it has clarified on multiple occasions, or that he can be so ignorant as to ignore the status of Taiwan,” the lead article in the Communist Party spokesperson China Daily.

“The conclusion of his words is that while he might say he wants to improve his country’s relations with China, he will either have to make a dedicated effort to better understand the problems that have led to an abrupt deterioration in bilateral relations. , or that he is diplomatically sharper.”

The editorial said that while Beijing had shown goodwill in hopes that the new Labor government would work with it to improve bilateral ties, Canberra did not respond. It said hopes for a reset in the relations “were fading by the day”.

“From deliberately playing up and slurring China’s normal security cooperation with the Solomon Islands to eagerly jumping on the American carts in support for its containment policy against China, the current Australian administration has shown no signs of changing the course set by its predecessor,” it said.

The attack contrasts sharply with the rapprochement of China’s ambassador to Australia, Xiao Qian, who said the change of government presented an opportunity for “possible improvement” in bilateral relations.

It noted the recent end of the nearly three-year cessation of contacts with ministers in Beijing when Defense Secretary Richard Marles met his Chinese counterpart. Labor has also indicated its willingness to reopen high-level dialogue with China.

Major corporations also hope that friendly relations between Australia and its largest trading partner will strengthen commercial ties, despite Beijing’s tariffs and restrictions on $20 billion in Australian exports.

However, rising tensions between Beijing and the United States and NATO allies in Europe complicated these expectations early on.

NATO accused Beijing on Wednesday of conspiring with Moscow to undermine the international rules-based order, as part of a new 10-year blueprint that first identified China as a global threat. The warning was made in NATO’s new Strategic Concept agreed at the Madrid summit.

Rising tensions between China, US

NATO’s stance, the first time China has been listed as a threat since the alliance was formed in 1949, has been backed by Australia and its Pacific allies Japan, South Korea and New Zealand, whose leaders had been invited to Madrid.

China has repeatedly accused the United States and NATO of fueling tensions between Russia and Ukraine and fears a similar security alliance is being formed in Asia-Pacific. Australia, Japan and South Korea shared fears that China could launch a Ukrainian invasion of Taiwan and were concerned about its pursuit of a security presence in the Pacific.

“NATO has tried to make progress in new areas and domains and called for bloc confrontation. The world must keep its vigilance and firmly reject it. NATO must stop drawing ideological lines, fueling political confrontations or trying to start a new Cold War,” a spokesman for China’s foreign ministry said on Wednesday evening.

China also this week rejected comparisons between Taiwan and Ukraine, because Taiwan was not a sovereign country.

‘Must reaffirm our democratic values’

The State Department also criticized this week’s Group of Seven (G7) communiqué, which criticized China for human rights violations in Hong Kong, Xinjiang and its actions in the East and South China Seas. President Xi Jinping will travel to Hong Kong this week for the 25th anniversary of the city’s handover to China.

“In terms of human rights, the G7 countries, with their own track record far from perfect, do not have the authority to lecture others or use human rights issues as a political tool to interfere in the internal affairs of other countries” the spokesman said.

Asked about China’s response to the NATO summit and Beijing’s comments that he threatened to re-establish Australia-China relations, Mr Albanian said he was “strong supporter of the NATO communiqué” .

He noted that the communiqué referred to China’s new relationship with Russia after the war in Ukraine.

“We need to reaffirm our democratic values ​​and that is something that happened at the NATO summit.”